EDITING COURSE – Learn the process and psychology of film editing and how to properly shoot your footage.

  • This course is open for 12 weeks
  • 16 lesson series
  • Certificate of completion
  • 4 hours, 37 minutes of video
  • Industry-Leading Instructors
  • Downloadable Class Materials
  • Illustrated Companion Guides

ABOUT THIS COURSE

In the Arts & Business Center Editing Course, Emmy-winning television and film editors take you inside the process and psychology of film editing. Learn how to properly shoot your footage on set to maximize your options in the editing room, when to cut from one shot to the next, how to choose your shot selection, how to work with the editor, and how to create the most emotion in each scene. We will take you step-by-step through the editing process itself from developing a workflow and managing your data through the assembly cut, rough cut, fine cut, online process, and colour grading. Learn how to conduct test screenings, manage feedback from producers, and deliver a final product that meets both technical demands as well as the director’s vision.

THE LESSONS

Introduction to editing

Editing a movie is the process of trying and retrying, assembling and disassembling, shuffling and shifting shots so the whole movie becomes greater than the sum of its parts. In this module series, we will look at the editing process from a creative standpoint – not which button to push or how to add transitions, but rather the basic core of editing – when do you cut from one shot to the next, how do you create emotion, why does one edit work and another doesn’t.

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

  • How to prepare for the editing process in Pre-Production
  • How to plan shot sizes, composition, and coverage for the editorial style of your film

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD REGISTRATION FORM

Building an Editing Suite

In this module, you will learn the components of an editing system, what you need, and what you should have to properly edit a movie.

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

The history of editing systems; The key components of an editing suite; Choosing the right hard drives and backups; Monitors; Speakers

Hiring an editor

Hiring an editor can be a challenging and daunting process. Unlike hiring an actor or a cinematographer, his or her work is not as easily identifiable on screen. A simple scene may have been an editorial feat of genius to salvage poorly-shot footage, and a technically brilliant scene may have been a simple task thanks to an overabundance of footage.

In this module, you will learn how to find a qualified editor, how to assess an editor’s demo reel, tips for ensuring his vision and communication style match yours, and how to ultimately get the best person for the job.

Gain the skills to hire the most influential person in the crafting of your movie – the editor.

  • 10:46 video that walks you through the process of hiring an editor
  • Complete companion guide

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

When in the project it is best to hire an editor; How to read an editor’s demo reel

Working with an editor

Working with an editor requires one very simple component – trust.  Trust that he can take your footage and assemble it in a way that makes the story better than the sum of its parts.  As a director, you’re exhausted from the shoot, anxious to see a cut of the film, nervous to see what works and doesn’t work, and unless you have the proper dialogue with the editor, the process could be a disaster.

In the module, you will learn techniques for communicating your vision to the editor, the editor’s workflow, and what you can do to get the best results possible in the editing room.

 Learn how to work with one of the most influential people on your movie – the editor, and learn to do it right.

  • 20:23 video that walks you through how to work with an editor
  • Complete companion guide

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

The editor/director relationship; How to work with an editor to best serve the project; The power of objectivity and how to maintain it in the editing room; The role of the director in the editing room; Learning to trust the editor; Learning how to communicate with the editor to best convey your vision

Concept of editing

Working with an editor requires one very simple component – trust.  Trust that he can take your footage and assemble it in a way that makes the story better than the sum of its parts.  As a director, you’re exhausted from the shoot, anxious to see a cut of the film, nervous to see what works and doesn’t work, and unless you have the proper dialogue with the editor, the process could be a disaster.

In the module, you will learn techniques for communicating your vision to the editor, the editor’s workflow, and what you can do to get the best results possible in the editing room.

Learn how to work with one of the most influential people on your movie – the editor, and learn to do it right.

  • 20:23 video that walks you through how to work with an editor
  • Complete companion guide

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

The editor/director relationship; How to work with an editor to best serve the project; The power of objectivity and how to maintain it in the editing room; The role of the director in the editing room; Learning to trust the editor; Learning how to communicate with the editor to best convey your vision

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD REGISTRATION FORM

Data Management and workflow

Footage, images, sound effects, music, ambience, titles, CGI, composites – there are a lot of elements that go into a movie.  With tens of thousands of shots filmed for a feature film, thousands of sound elements, and dozens of people working on assembling these into one single movie, it’s critical to keep the materials organized and develop a workflow that keeps all the members of your post-production team focused on moulding the story – not searching for one-shot buried on a hard drive.

In this module, you will learn how to develop a system for organizing the footage from set to post, how to develop a workflow that keeps the process smooth and conflict-free, how to conduct post-production meetings, the role of the post-production supervisor, standard techniques for labelling and managing footage, and data handling techniques.

Create a workflow so your team can focus on what’s important… the story.

  • 26:39 video that takes you through the process of managing your footage and editing workflow
  • Complete companion guide
  • Step-by-step guide of the editing process

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

How to properly log footage on set; How to coordinate the post-production process with the team; The roles of the post-production team; How to develop a workflow for transferring files; How to properly use the Script Supervisor’s notes; How to maintain continuity; How to label shots; How to organize footage at both the desktop and editing software level

The Assembly Cut

The assembly cut is the first draft of the movie edit in which the director has the opportunity to see the movie for the first time.  While this can be a time-consuming, challenging, and stressful process, a well-crafted assembly cut lays the foundation for the director to begin sculpting the footage into the best possible story.

In this module, you will learn how to approach the assembly cut, how to manage music and sound effects, what should or shouldn’t be included, and how to address issues of pacing, story, and character development.

Start the editing process right by mastering the first, and most important step of the edit.

  • 21:33 video that walks you through the first round of editing, the assembly cut
  • Complete resource guide

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

What the assembly cut is and what should be accomplished during this phase of the editing process; The role of the editor during the assembly cut; The director’s role in the edit; How to work with sound effects and music during the assembly cut process; How to work with needle drop music; How to deal with digital effects during the assembly process

Stock footage

Stock footage is existing footage you can license for use in your production. It can be a fantastic resource if you’re in a pinch or cannot afford to shoot the footage yourself.

In this module, you will learn how to use stock footage, how to understand a licensing agreement, where to find stock footage, how to manage the technical requirements, and what your rights are when distributing your production.

Don’t spend the money to shoot it yourself when someone else has done it for you.

  • 20:58 video that shows you how to use stock footage
  • Illustrated companion guide

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD REGISTRATION FORM

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

What is stock footage; How stock footage can be used in your project; How to match the look and technical specifications of stock footage to your project; How a royalty-free license works; How an editorial license works; How rights managed license works; How public domain footage works; How to purchase stock footage

Editing a Dialogue Scene

The power behind the performance isn’t limited to an actor’s work on camera, but how the editor cuts the performance in the editing room.  The pace at which you edit a scene, whom you choose to show on screen, the degree of overlap of dialogue, and a narrative understanding of the scene are tools that help you mould the scene into a visually arresting moment with just the right emotional intent.

In this module, you will learn the correct and incorrect ways of shooting dialogue on set, advanced techniques for manipulating the pacing and emotional intensity of the scene, how to work with changing background ambience, techniques for balancing the visual performance with the dialogue, how to mix the audio, ultimately how to get the best performance through the edit.

  • Learn the techniques to direct the scene after it was shot and improve the performances in the editing room.
  • 34:27 video that teaches you how to properly shoot and edit a dialogue scene
  • Complete companion guide
  • Guide on time management as an editor
  • A complete walkthrough of how a dialogue scene is edited

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

The incorrect way and the correct way to shoot a dialogue scene; How to properly edit a scene between two people; How to mix the audio between two actors; How to create L-type and J-type edits

Editing Action

Action isn’t the chase sequences, gunplay, or fight scenes in a movie, it’s the movement of characters around the set. If the action is well-edited, it will feel seamless to the audience, transcending the edits from one shot to the next.

In this module, you will learn how to edit action for proper flow, continuity, and pacing.  Learn techniques for compressing time, revealing only the essentials to keep the story moving forward, and advanced editing techniques used by master editors.

Give the illusion of real-time coverage of a scene even if you only used one camera with the techniques in the Editing Action module.

  • 24:56 video that walks you through how to edit action
  • Complete companion resource guide
  • Complete editing demonstration

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

How to properly shoot a scene with action; How to edit montages; How to maintain emotion in a scene; How to give the editor options in the edit bay to craft the emotion of the scene

The rough cut

Much like a screenplay is truly written in the rewriting process, a movie is edited in the rough cut stage.  Now that you have a solid assembly cut, it’s now time to remake the movie by cutting, trimming, adding, and moving scenes to improve the structure and pacing of the narrative, performances, and emotion of the scene.

In this module, you will learn how to approach the rough cut, determine what moments work, how to re-structure the story, and ultimately view the movie on its own- divorced from the script.

From the first scene to the credits, take control of your movie and turn it into the most entertaining experience possible.

  • 19:04 video that walks you through the process of editing the rough cut
  • Complete companion guide
  • Tips on the unwritten rules of the editing room

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

What happens during the rough cut process; How to finesse act breaks, story arcs and character arcs; How to manage deadlines; How to work with music and sound effects in the rough cut process; How to improve pacing in the movie; How to work with titles and credits

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD REGISTRATION FORM

Testing screenings

After hundreds of hours crafting your movie in the editing room, it’s ready to be shown to audiences for feedback.  At this point you’re exhausted, you’ve seen the footage hundreds of times, edited and re-edited scenes dozens of time, and know the story inside out.  It’s time to get an objective opinion from fresh eyes, but be careful – test screening can be a double-edged sword, mixing valuable feedback with uninformed opinions that can cloud your judgment even further.

In this module, you will learn how to prepare for and conduct a test screening, how to choose the right test audience, what questions to ask after the test screening, and how to filter the responses into usable comments that can improve the story.

Find the objectivity you want through the noise of a test audience.

  • 21:34 video that teaches you how to conduct a test screening of your film
  • Complete companion guide

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

How to organize a test screening; Who to invite and not to invite; Questions to ask the audience; How to interpret the data from a test screening; How to manage criticism and notes from executives

The final cut

Polish, polish, then polish more until its perfect – that is the mantra behind the fine cut.

In this module, you will learn techniques for perfecting every single frame of your movie before locking the picture edit, how you will know when the movie is done, the implications of locking the picture, and the process of prepping the film for audio.

Making a mistake at this stage can cost thousands of dollars and valuable time later when the film is in the audio post-production phase, so learn how to approach the fine cut process right the first time and walk always confident in your picture lock.

  • 14:44 video that walks you through the fine cut process
  • Complete companion guide

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

What is the fine cut process?; What does the editor do during the fine cut?; How are transitions, continuity, and graphics handled during the fine cut process; Knowing when to stop; How the picture is locked

Offline/online editing

In this day and age, large 2k and 4k uncompressed formats can be taxing on even the most advanced computer system, so it’s important to consider your options in the editing room.

In this module, you will learn how and when to work in an offline environment, how to transition to an online cut, and techniques for ensuring the process goes smoothly.

Work small then go big with an offline edit.

  • 8:28 video that walks you through the offline/online process
  • Complete resource guide

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

What is an offline edit; What is an online edit; When is it appropriate to create an offline edit; How the process of creating an online edit work

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD REGISTRATION FORM

Colour grading

Today’s acquisition technology has opened up a virtually limitless array of tools to manipulate the image long after the movie is shot.  From making technical adjustments to ensure shots match each other to crafting a compelling colour palette for the entire film, colour grading has empowered every director to get the film to look the way he wants.

In this module you will learn the colour grading process, how it differs amongst formats, the balance between technical and artistic grading, how to protect yourself from the “fix-it-in-post” mentality, and how to get the look you want.

Harness the power of colour and use it to best tell your story in the colour grading module.

  • 15:40 video that walks you through the colour timing process
  • Complete companion guide

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

What is colour timing?; How the technique is used for technical reasons; How the technique can be used for artistic purposes; Technical limitations of colour timing

Understanding compression

Compression can be a confusing subject.  With ever-evolving compression formats, delivery mechanisms, and exhibition devices, it’s more important than ever for today’s filmmakers to understand the art of compressing their audio and video.

WHAT STUDENTS WILL LEARN

Defining compression; The components of compression; Lossy and Lossless compression; Colour space; The art of compression

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD REGISTRATION FORM

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